Asian History

AsianHistory

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TheRole of Geography in the Ancient Chinese History

China’sgeographical characteristics such as long rivers, temperatureclimate, fertile soils, and isolated valleys played a great role inits early civilization. Firstly, China was located between tworivers, Yangtze and Yellow Rivers. These two rivers stretch from thesea and then flow hundreds of kilometres inland. In addition, theriver valleys surround the country landmasses. This made it easierfor the early Chinese government to control the whole country just bycontrolling the two rivers (Module).

Furthermore,the land was fertile. The two rivers deposited fertile soils, knownas loess, which was essential for farming (Liu, 2010). As a result,China produced surplus farm product that led to development ofsettlement and specialization. Besides, China did not have bigmountain ranges hence, it was easily controllable form a singlecentral location (Module).

Additionally,China had varied climate. The different climate in differentlocations allowed the country to produce variety of crops. Forinstance, millet and wheat were grown on the northern side that wasdry, while rice was grown on the southern side that was moist.Eurasians made stone tools that were used during planting andharvesting. They were the first to develop agriculture technology(Liu, 2010).

Accordingto Fernández-Armesto(2009), the sink road also contributed to the civilization of China.The Silk Road was used thousand of traders who traded differentcommodities for different cultures and with people across differentlocations. Consequently, traders spread all over and at the sometimespreading culturally rich items. The traders travelled through China,Persia, Europe, India, and Gulf Coast. The Silk Road was significantfactor to spread beliefs, cultural ideas, and lifestyles across Asiaand Europe. Routes that were crossing deserts and oases were alsosuitable for camels. Although the sink road underwent a lot oftransformation, it still maintained its original purpose(Fernández-Armesto,2009).

Thesilk diplomacy played a great role in Chinese civilization. In theeastern side of Yuezhi territory were Xiongnu with a powerful nomadicconfederacy. However, the Xiongnu were always in conflict with theirneighbouring states. These two communities invested in the silktextiles. They used the silk floss to pad bedcovers and line furcoats. The sink garment made them look more elegant. Eventually, thesilk become a sign of prestige and power (Fernández-Armesto,2009).

Atany time, China was under a certain dynasty that governed them. Forinstance, the Qin dynasty had strict and cruel laws that prohibitedpeople from engaging in certain projects, including the Great wall.Han Dynasty replaced Qin Dynasty though its rulers frequentlyreceived threats from Xiongnu. Further, the chin dynasty had a greatimpact on China civilization, since it united all people under oneempire. Besides, Chinese was the only language of communicationacross the whole country even beyond the great wall. This madetrading easy since both the buyer and the seller were using the samelanguage (Fernández-Armesto,2009).

Similaritiesand Differences of Civilization in China and Other Countries Such asEgypt and Mesopotamia

Thereare significant similarities and differences between civilization inChina and other countries such as Egypt and Mesopotamia. Firstly,Mesopotamia and Egypt were both in floods basins unlike China. Egyptwas characterized with serenity and stability while Mesopotamia withtensions and turmoil. China is surrounded by rivers while Egypt alsohave rivers (Liu,2010).

Secondly,China had a friendly climate for farming and human living whileMesopotamia had a harsh climate due to regular flooding of riverEuphrates and Tigris. Egypt has cool and warm climate. Nevertheless,Egypt is centred on river Nile hence, it has rich and fertile soilsimilar to China (Module).

References

Fernández-Armesto,F. (2009). Theworld: a history: combined volume(Vol. 2). Pearson College Div.

Liu,X. (2010).&nbspTheSilk Road in world history.Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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