Integration of Undocumented Immigrants in the U.S

Integration of UndocumentedImmigrants in the U.S

Immigrationhas beena touchysubjectin theU.S formanyyears,yet ithas beenpartof thecountry’sDNA. Nonetheless,there is a widespreadconcern about immigrants’capacityto integrateinto thelargersociety,eventhoughtheentireprocessof integrationencompassesscratchy adjustmentsamong immigrant,their children,andhostcommunities.Integrationhas occurredvirtuallydevoidof anypolicyinterventionandrelativelylittlefederalsupport,depending primarilyon a sturdylabormarketandfirst-ratepubliceducation.Undocumented immigrantsare tornby differingculturalandsocialdemandswhilestillencounteringthetestof ingressinto astrange,hostileenvironment.Themigrationprocess,fornot verycandidreasons,appearsto boostthesenseof cohesionamong immigrants,whoare oftenunifiedby bondsof kinship,ethnicity, communityor class.Symbolsthat depictethnicity includedreligiousbehavior,language,andthatserveas potentreminderof their homecountryandthatmarksthem as outsidersin thenewAmerica (Chavez 119-121).

Forillegalandundocumented immigrantscrossingtheU.S borderis a territorialpassagewaythat can be dividedinto three crucialphases:separationfrom society,transitionphase,andtheintegrationphase.Separationphasesare particularlydifficultforimmigrants.Thereasonsthat propelledpeopleto opt to leavetheir homecountrycan be culturally andsociallyconstructedandveryparamountfortheindividualsinvolved.Statistics depictsthatmajorityof theundocumented immigrantsare chieflybetween theagesof 9-29 with an intricatearrayof motivesforleavingthecountryof origin(Chavez 126).

There are various reasons whyimmigrants move to the U.S. One of thekeyreasonswhymanypeoplemovetotheUnited States is to lookfora jobopportunityandmakemoneyfora particularcourse.Moreoftenthan not youthfulunmarriedmenandwomenwhoare an overall stratagemto supplyincomeforthefamilymigrateto theU.S fora shortdurationandthengobackhome.Itis visiblethatwhilemostof theunmarriedcome to theUnited States to lookforresourcesto supporttheir studies,somemoveto getmoneyandgetmarried(Chavez 128). Itis unmistakablethatthemostwidespreadelementthat propelsmanyundocumented immigrantsto gotheU.S is lackof opportunitiesin their countryof origin.Scarcityof jobopportunitiesis a commonphenomenonin developingnationsandthosethat are privilegedto getsomeemploymenttheyare paidmeagerwagesandworkunder deplorableconditions.Itis not a wonderthatmanyemployersin theU.S havenoproblemswith undocumented immigrantsbecausetheyofferready,cheapandcommittedlabor.Theseimmigrantsare willingto performjobsthat callforlotsof physicalactivitiesandthosethat takelonghours.Whilenot manyU.S citizenswould wantto dosuchjobs,as mostare interestedin jobsthat havesalarystructure,immigrantscomewith one goalto makemoneyandprovidebasiclivingto their familyandnextof kin.Anothermainfactorthatfuelsmovementis thepursuitof the‘American dream’to gainmoreeconomicopportunitiesandachieveupwardmobility.Othermotivesincludefemaleswhowantto runawayfrom existingrelationship,familyfeudsandplainlyoutforadventureandto satisfycuriosity.Asizable numberalsomovesto continuerelationshipconnectionwith menwhomigrateto theU.S (Chavez 21-39).

There are various challengesfaced by immigrants in the new world. After crossingtheU.S borderimmigrants,effectivelyenterthesecondstage,thatChavez refersto as transitionphase.In thisphase,manyimmigrantsgothrough veryhardsocialandeconomiclife.Theylivein fearandapprehensionsince theydonot knowwhatwill e theprospectsandwhatbarrierswill cometheir wayin pursuitof the Americandream.(Chavez 41).

After enter,theU.S undocumented immigrantseffectivelybecometransnational families,since mostof their familymembersare in their countryof origin.Itis evidentthatsuchfamiliesgothrough financial,emotionalandphysicalstress.Fullyawarethattheycan donothingto helpotherthan prayfortheir lovedoneswhomoveto theU.S,manyfamiliesendurefinancialhardshipin thehopethatone-daythingswill change.Thosethat are luckygetan opportunityto immigrateto theU.S whentheir spousesg forthem Chavez 119-121). Theprospectsof gettinga jobopportunityplaysa majorpartin determiningwhetheran immigrantshall settlein theU.S orwill opt to gobackhome.Since manyhavelimitededucationandworkexperiencemanyae willingto acceptanyjobthat comestheir way.With time,someare ableto makelateralorevenupwardmovementdepending on thenatureof thejobavailable.

Thelifeof immigrantsis differentfrom thelifeof American citizens.Immigrantslivein dilapidatedhouses,under challenging economicenvironmentandin constanthiding from authoritiesforfearof deportation.Manycannot accesscleanwater,socialutilities,andevenfood.Thepoorlivingconditions,lackof properhousingandsanitaryfacilitiesposesa healthhazard.Theequationis compoundedby thefactthatevenin timesof sicknessmanyare loathto seekhealthservicesforfearof beingdeported.Immigrantscannot attendschools,churchservicesorevengoto moviesto avoiddrawingtoomuchattention(Chavez 63-82). Immigrants,unlike American, havenoplacewheretheycan findhelpevenwhensituationbecomeunbearable.Itis worthstatingthatdue to themanychallengesin thetransitionphasenot manyimmigrantsare ableto completethetransition.Thegreatestimpedimentto movingto theintegrationstageis thepersonal,social,culturalandjobgaps.

In thefinalphaseimmigrantsare ableto securejobopportunity,accumulate wealth,formfamilies,becomefluentin English andevenestablishcredit.Undocumented immigrantswhosecurejobopeninganddeveloplinkswith employeesare ableto createeconomicrelationshipwith theAmerican society.Socialintegrationis madepossibleby theincreasingtieswith manyfriendandfamilieswhileculturalintegrationcan onlyoccurifan immigrantis ableto learnEnglish. Thisshall facilitatesocialincorporationthrough socialaspectssuchas televisionandschools.Personalincorporationvariesfrom one personto anotherpeggedon one’s beliefsystem,conductandlanguages(Chavez 173-85).

Evenafter establishingthelinksmentionedabove manyundocumented immigrantsdonot attainthecitizenship staturedue to thesocietal view.Ultimately,itis theAmerican societythat will maketheultimatedecisionthrough their representativesin Congress on whetherundocumented immigrantsshall becomecitizens(Chavez 5).

From the aforementioned, it isnotable that, while proceeding gradually, evolution among variousgroups of undocumented immigrants in the U.S is vastly jagged. Thesize of illegal immigrants’ populace continues to rise and a greatimpediment to total political, economic integration and socialcohesion. Thelifeof immigrantsis differentfrom thelifeof American citizens.Immigrantslivein dilapidatedhouses,under challenging economicenvironmentandin constanthiding from authoritiesforfearof deportation.Manycannot accesscleanwater,socialutilities,andevenfood.It is evident that immigrants encounter daunting tasks in the processof integration.

WorkCited

Chavez,Leo. ShadowedLives: Undocumented Immigration in American Society.Boston,Massachusetts:Cengage Learning, 2012 Print.

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